facebook Scientists develop 3D print 'motion sculptures' from two ... - Vigyaa
Close

Delete Collection?

Are you sure you want to delete this collection permanently?

Close

Delete Collection?

Are you sure you want to delete this collection permanently?

Everyone has a Story to Tell and an Experience to Share!

Let’s Start Writing
88b4221c-526e-482f-ba79-a3306b91a192

433 views

Scientists develop 3D print 'motion sculptures' from two dimensional videos

MIT scientists have developed a way to 3D print "motion sculptures" from two dimensional videos that can help professional athletes and dancers to better visualise human body movements.

734411-mosculp-motion-sculptures-1

MIT scientists have developed a way to 3D print "motion sculptures" from two dimensional videos that can help professional athletes and dancers to better visualise human body movements. The system uses an algorithm that can take 2D videos and turn them into that show how a human body moves through space. In addition to being an intriguing aesthetic visualisation of shape and time, the team envisions that their "MoSculp" system could enable a much more detailed study of motion for professional athletes, dancers, or anyone who wants to improve their physical skills.

"Imagine you have a video of Roger Federer serving a ball in a tennis match, and a video of yourself learning tennis," said PhD student Xiuming Zhang at Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) in the US. "You could then build motion sculptures of both scenarios to compare them and more comprehensively study where you need to improve," said Zhang.

Since motion sculptures are 3D, users can use a computer interface to navigate around the structures and see them from different viewpoints, revealing motion-related information inaccessible from the original viewpoint. Artists and scientists have long struggled to gain better insight into movement, limited by their own camera lens and what it could provide. Previous work has mostly used so-called "stroboscopic" photography techniques, which look a lot like the images in a flip book stitched together.

However, since these photos only show snapshots of movement, you wouldn't be able to see as much of the trajectory of a person's arm when they're hitting a golf ball, for example. These photographs also require laborious pre-shoot setup, such as using a clean background and specialised depth cameras and lighting equipment. All MoSculp needs is a video sequence, researchers said.

Given an input video, the system first automatically detects 2D key points on the subject's body, such as the hip, knee, and ankle of a ballerina while she's doing a complex dance sequence. Then, it takes the best possible poses from those points to be turned into 3D "skeletons." After stitching these skeletons together, the system generates a motion sculpture that can be 3D printed, showing the smooth, continuous path of movement traced out by the subject.

Users can customise their figures to focus on different body parts, assign different materials to distinguish among parts, and even customise lighting. The system works best for larger movements, like throwing a ball or taking a sweeping leap during a dance sequence.

It also works for situations that might obstruct or complicate movement, such as people wearing loose clothing or carrying objects. Currently, the system only uses single-person scenarios, but the team soon hopes to expand to multiple people. This could open up the potential to study things like social disorders, interpersonal interactions, and team dynamics.



Related Articles

Are you tired of doing card-making and scrapbooking? Cheer up! We have a unique crafting idea for making wooden embellishments. You can use these embellishments in your own handmade cards, scrapbook pages, or art journals. Also, you can create wooden ornaments for your home or yourself using this method. You can create these adornments by using stamping techniques on wooden discs or any other wooden shape. For this, you can buy stamps for card-making from an online store at a great deal and also check out their latest promotions.

None

Materials Required - Wooden discs or wooden surfaces of any other shape, rubber stamps, and ink pads.

Which Stamp to Pick?

You can choose any rubber stamp of your choice, mounted or unmounted, keeping the size of the surface you want to stamp on in mind. If the stamp does not fit the wooden surface then the image will not look good and attractive. And also, you can use the same stamps as the ones you use for card-making to make an attractive and abstract image.

Stamping on Wooden Discs

We have chosen wooden discs as they are ideal for stamping, you can use any other wooden shape of your choice if you like. Make sure to select the wood wisely as the porous surface of the untreated wood can cause the ink or colors to bleed through. It is also better to practice stamping on rough sheets or other unknown surfaces before stamping on wooden discs. After enough practice, take the stamps, add some dark color ink, and stamp it on the discs. If you see ink running through the grains of the wood, then paint the surface of the wood to seal the pores.

When you do this, put even pressure from all sides so that the image does not look smudged or blotchy. Also, you need to be very careful with your fingers while stamping to make sure that the disc does not slip. Afterward, leave the piece to dry for some time.

Add a Finishing Touch

You can leave the stamped images on the wooden discs uncolored so that the wood is seen through. And if you want to color the image, then first check if the color bleeds or else, it will have a distorted and unfinished effect on the image. You can use color pencils or chalk to color as they are dry colors and won’t run through the grains. Seal the piece with a clear varnish to protect the image on wood.  

Reference Image
Close