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Testing:- Javo Reinvents Architectural Photography Through Motion Art

My inspiration to become a professional artist stems from my natural, creative drive. During childhood, my parents insisted on keeping me away from video games and digital entertainment. This upbringing allowed me to play outside and train my imagination. My mind was constantly active, thinking of new things I could construct or invent.

My inspiration to become a professional artist stems from my natural, creative drive. During childhood, my parents insisted on keeping me away from video games and digital entertainment. This upbringing allowed me to play outside and train my imagination. My mind was constantly active, thinking of new things I could construct or invent. I would ignore my friends, who huddled around the TV with their game consoles, and found activities outside, which molded my mind into a creative one. It got to the point where I started constructing my own visions in order to fulfill my creative needs. For instance, I used to ask construction site workers for wood, and built seven tree houses in Viña Del Mar.


Who are your most recent and exciting clients you worked with?

One of my most recent clients has been T-wayne, (Texas Wayne), an American rapper from Houston Texas, who is best known for his Billboard Hot 100 single, "Nasty Freestyle". He reached out to me saying that he loved my work, and asked me if I could create some motion art for him. The project is still under wraps, so the Plotagraph art hasn't published yet. Then there is a big Chilean Outdoor company called Lippi, who hired me to animate some of their outdoor ad campaigns, as well as their 2018 Winter Products. I was also the first, international certified ambassador for Plotaverse, which has been a really exciting journey. I was able to travel around the world, work closely with their team, and establish a lot of new industry connections.

What was your reaction when you saw a Plotagraph for the first time?

About a year ago, I spotted a Plotagraph on a popular Instagram account. It was an image of a massive swell, captured by Brian Bielmann, who is a renowned surf photographer. I kept staring at the wave, which rolled in constant motion. For a good 3 minutes straight, I tried wrapping my mind around how this effect was created, when I finally realized that the wave would never break. I was mind blown and started researching how I could recreate this perfectly looping motion on my own. After rummaging through accounts and hashtags, I found Plotaverse, downloaded their software, which at the time was newly released from beta, and never stopped using it.

How has this new technique affected your style of motion art?

Plotaverse has definitely affected my style in a positive way, as a motion graphics artist, and even as a person. Using this technique lead me to meeting a new class of artists, influencers, music bands, celebrities, brands, you name it. It opened up doors to a creative process I never knew existed. I used to edit videos based on film, which I still do, but it requires a number of softwares, which is tedious and tiring. But with Plotaverse, all I need is a still image and my imagination. Hard line animation has become my signature style of motion art. Hard lines are commonly found in architectural photography, and have a very solid, static appearance. The key to creating naturally appearing motion is my meditative approach before animating. I close my eyes, and allow my obsessive compulsive nature to map out the areas, that would look smooth and realistic, if set into motion. Sometimes less is more. Then I analyze the line separations, which helps me create smooth transitions from one line to the next. I also scan the image for lines, which have perspective to them, because they affect the animation direction.

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What is your favorite success story as an Art influencer?

I regularly receive fan messages on Instagram, but this instance was a little bit different. A lady reached out to me, explaining how much she loved my work, that it had inspired her for months, and how tired she was of her job as a Wall Street employee. After a few days of back and forth, I stated to her that life is too short to be working in an environment you dislike, with people you dislike. In that moment, she had an epiphany and literally expressed: "I am not happy." She quit her job months later, and started creating her own art. Having contributed to a person's genuine happiness and life quality on such a fundamental level was an exceptional experience.

What advice would you give to young aspiring artists?

When working on visual projects and campaigns, keep in mind where your art is going to be seen. Bear in mind the display mediums, the geography and the culture tied to it. For example, when creating an animation for a Facebook page, an Instagram story, a Television ad, or a storefront, it is extremely important to keep designs specific to the display mediums, proportions and audiences. Always collect and remember the specifications before starting your work. I also recommend adding Plotaverse to the toolbox for digital projects. It helped me save a great deal of time, and deliver something new and eye catching. Also, never give up! In the beginning, projects can often feel overwhelmingly demanding, as though your work is never good enough. Don't be too hard on yourself, but also listen carefully to creative direction.

What are a few things you wish you knew when you first started as a professional artist?

A few things I wished I knew before working with clients is how to charge for your work. In most cases my clients are from all over the world which can make the process a little bit harder. I charge in US dollars, which can lead to unfortunate exchange rates for some countries. I suggest asking your clients where they are based, and research how much a motion graphics artists makes in that particular country. I also learned that the success from promoting my work on social media is at the mercy of the platforms' algorithms. The engagement it gets does not necessarily depend on the quality of my work, as I used to assume. Business accounts on social media are experiencing a reduced audience reach, which means that the platforms' algorithms are making your work disappear in virtual space, leaving a small percentage of your followers to see them. So don't get discouraged if you notice less views and feedback on your art! I keep my portfolio on Plotaverse's sharing platform, because there are no algorithms to worry about, and I can post my art in high resolution.

What are your plans and goals for the year ahead?

I definitely see myself using motion art in the future, because I believe that motion art is the future. Video content is taking over global and social media, which has inspired me to open up a motion graphics studio. I have transitioned from traditional photography to digital arts, and am working towards becoming an art director with the goal to modernize digital video content creation.

How can our readers follow you on social media?

@Javo, Plotaverse |@javografo, Instagram

Thank you so much for this inspiring interview!

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